Done By: Lurika Fisher

The infection pass from person to person when in contact with other persons blood, semen, vaginal or other bodily fluids. 

This infection can be caused by bacteria, virus or a parasite that enters and grows in the body. The 3 most common types of STI’s are: Chlomydia, Gonnorrhoea and Syphilis. But there are others eg. Human papillomavirus (HPV), Genital Herpes, HIV&AIDS

STI’s can be mistaken for a UTI’s, so make sure you get tested to receive the correct treatment.


STI’s is an infection that can be spread through sexual contact such as vaginal, oral or anal sex. The risk of spread increases through: unprotected sex( vaginal,oral or anal). During genital touching.Same sex partners can also spread the infection to each other.From pregnant mother or breastfeeding mother to the baby, if left untreated.

The infection pass from person to person when in contact with other persons blood, semen, vaginal or other bodily fluids. 

This infection can be caused by bacteria, virus or a parasite that enters and grows in the body. The 3 most common types of STI’s are: Chlomydia, Gonnorrhoea and Syphilis. But there are others eg. Human papillomavirus (HPV), Genital Herpes, HIV&AIDS

Signs to look out for?

An unusual discharge including a foul smell or  blood from genital areas including the anus. Pain on urination.Itchy, Rash, Blisters or Sores around genital areas or anus. Lumps, Warts or skin growths around genital areas or anus.
Note to self: STI’s can lead to chronic pelvic pain, still births and infertility in women. Also, women have a higher risk of getting a STI’s from unprotected vaginal or anal sex because of our anatomy. Also, some STI’s can be cured but some can only be managed by symptomatic relieve treatments.

Treatments available?

You may feel embarrassed or too personal when sharing your sexual life information with your health care provider but open and honesty is the only way to help yourself get the correct treatment. Do not feel embarrassed when you decide to get tested or when coming for treatment. It’s for your own good. 


Prevention of UTS’s advice?

Abstain!!!

But if you decide to have sex, lower your risk by:Getting vaccinated: for HPV and Hep B.Use condoms:

Make sure the condom is on the penis before it touches the vagina, mouth, or anus. 

Get tested. Be monogamous: stick to 1 partner.

Do not abuse alcohol or drugs: drinking too much or using drugs increases risky behavior and may put you at risk for possible sexual assault and exposure to STI’s.

Think carefully about your choices. The choice is always yours.